Mary Kay To Makeover Women Veterans

Mary Kay representatives from San Diego will makeover 22 women veterans attending REBOOT Workshop Wednesday, March 5, 2014 beginning at 1 p.m. The event takes place at NVTSI headquarters in Mission Valley, 4141 Camino Del Rio S., San Diego. Setup begins at noon and the event ends at 4 p.m. Participants will be available for interviews.

Mary Kay Senior Sales Director, Lynnae Bowen will oversee five Mary Kay consultants while they makeover 22 women veterans as part of REBOOT Workshop’s program teaching veterans to dress for success. This is the second all-women REBOOT Workshop NVTSI has provided to help address the needs of women transitioning from military service.

“Mary Kay is proud to give back to our women veterans by providing makeovers to the women of REBOOT Class 62.  Mary Kay’s philosophy is to enrich the lives of women by empowering them to reach their full potential,” said Bowen.

Mary Kay is in its 51st year of business and is one of the largest beauty companies in the world with $3.5 billion in sales.  It is currently promoting its brand “Discover What You Love” after its most successful year since Mary Kay Ash started the company more than 50 years ago. Mary Kay believes in social responsibility by helping others through philanthropy and empowering women to become their own business owners as Mary Kay beauty consultants.

NVTSI, through REBOOT Workshops and other initiatives, has helped more than 1,000 veterans make a successful transition from military service to civilian life including employment, education, personal outlook and well being. NVTSI has a proven 98% success rate of linking veterans with meaningful employment. For more information, visit www.nvtsi.org.

 

August Veteran Employment Situation Report covering July 2013

VETERAN UNEMPLOYMENT REPORTGeneral Summary

The BLS CPS report states there were 21,384,000 veterans alive in July, down from 21,412,000 in June, a loss of 28,000 veterans in July. This continues the trend of the shrinking veteran population due in large part to having an all-volunteer force since 1972 and not having a military draft. There were nearly sixty million veterans alive at the end of the Vietnam War. America has lost two thirds of the veterans in the last 41 years.

There were 10,923,000 veterans in the workforce in July, a decline of 27,000 from the 10,950,000 in June.

The CPS overall veteran unemployment rate for all veterans in July rose marginally to 6.4%. The rate in June was 6.3%. This is an increase of 0.1%. There were 702,000 unemployed veterans in June, up 15,000 from the 687,000 unemployed veterans in June.

The fact that the veteran unemployment rate remains lower than the non-veteran unemployment rate continues to be good news. The above information continues a positive trend for veterans. As the veteran unemployment rate remains lower than the non-veteran unemployment rate again reinforces the fact that veterans as a class continue to have better success finding employment than non-veterans!

Younger Veterans

An area where there has been a veteran unemployment issue over the last six years since the current call up policy was implemented on January 11, 2007 has been in the 18 to 24 year old group and the 25 to 29 year old group which make up a large part of the National Guard and Reserve (NG&R). The news for younger veterans continues to be mixed.

The unemployment rate for the 18 to 24 year old veterans in July fell to 17.4% (28,000) from 20.5% (34,000) in June. There are 34,000 18 to 24 year old veterans not in the labor force who are probably in school or technical training programs or may be disabled.

The unemployment rate for the 25 to 29 year old veterans in July rose to 12.3% (68,000) from June’s 10.0% (53,000). This reverses the trend of the 25 to 29 year old veterans who had been having a falling unemployment rate.

For comparison, the CPS overall unemployment rate for all 18 to 24 year olds (veterans and nonveterans) in July was 14.2% (2,938,000), down from the June rate of 16.3% (3,397,000). The unemployment rate for all 25 to 29 year olds in July was 8.4% (1,416,000), up from the June rate of 8.1% (1,363,000),

The fact that veterans are having better success at finding jobs than their civilian counterparts is good, but there are veterans who are having problems for a variety of reasons.

Older Veterans

Of the 702,000 unemployed veterans in July, 675,000 were over the age of 25. This is an increase of 24,000 from the 651,000 in June. The unemployment rates for the older veteran groups are as follows:

July             June
30 to 34 year olds    3.1% (25,000)        5.4% (112,000
35 to 39 year olds    7.5% (65,000)        4.5% (39,000)
40 to 44 year olds    5.6% (68,000)        6.0% (73,000)
45 to 49 year olds    4.3% (59,000)        5.0% (66,000)
50 to 54 year olds    7.0% (104,000)        7.4% (107,000)
55 to 59 year olds    7.1% (97,000)        7.1% (102,000)
60 to 64 year olds    6.5% (81,000)        4.8% (61,000)
65 year olds and over    5.8% (109,000)        6.8% (128,000

Like last month, these numbers indicate the emphasis for helping veterans with employment may need to add emphasis to the older veterans, especially those in their 50s and older as they now have higher unemployment numbers.

The publicity of younger veterans having problems promoted by the White House, the US Chamber of Commerce (USCC), National Federation of Independent Businesses (NFIB), veteran service organizations like the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), American Legion (Legion), Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA), Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), Student Veterans of America (SVA) and veteran employment sites like VetJobs (www.vetjobs.com) has been very successful. Now the same attention needs to be directed towards older veterans.

Women Veterans

The unemployment rate for women veterans in July dropped to 6.6% (92,000) from June’s 7.6% (107,000). This is a decrease of 1.0% (15,000). This is good as the unemployment rate for women veterans had been climbing. In comparison, the unemployment rate for all women (veteran and non-veteran) in July was 7.3% (5,263,000), down from the June rate of 7.4% (5,370,000).

The unemployment rate for 18 to 24 year old women veterans in July was 8.3% (3,000) down from the June rate of was 9.0% (4,000). This was a decrease of 0.7% (1,000). In contrast, the unemployment rate for all 18 to 24 women (veteran and non-veteran) in July was 12.6% (1,241,000), down from the June rate of 14.6% (1,453,000).

Gulf War II Veterans

The unemployment rate for Gulf War II era veterans in July was 7.7% (166,000), up from the June rate of 7.2% (160,000), an increase of 0.5% (6,000). This reverses the downward trend in unemployment for the Gulf War II veterans.

Black Veterans

The unemployment rate for Black veterans in July dropped to 7.2% (102,000), down from the June rate of 10.3% (154,000). In contrast, the unemployment rate for all Blacks in July was 12.6% (2,329,000) which represents a decrease from the June rate of 13.7%, (2,549,000). These numbers lend credence to the benefits of minorities having joined the military!

Asian Veterans

The unemployment rate for Asian veterans in July was 5.1% (8,000), an increase from the June rate which was 4.2% (7,000). The Asian veteran unemployment rate had been steadily moving downwards before this increase. In contrast, the unemployment rate for all Asians is 5.4% (458,000).

Hispanic Veterans

The unemployment rate for Hispanic veterans in July was 7.3% (62,000), a marginal increase from the June rate which was 7.2% (67,000). In comparison, the unemployment rate for all Hispanics (veteran and non-veteran) in July was 8.9% (2,181,000), an increase from the June rate of 8.7% (2,144,000).

First Lady’s Office Joins Military Sex Scandal Debate

First Lady Michelle Obama’s office Thursday entered the debate over the growing military sexual assaults scandal now plaguing the Pentagon by joining in a meeting with 16 members of Congress at the White House.
According to Politico, the lawmakers, most of them women, were there to discuss the issue with White House senior adviser Valerie Jarrett, violence against women adviser Lynn Rosenthal, and Tina Tchen, the first lady’s chief of staff.
Sen. Patty Murray told reporters afterwards that the administration is taking sexual assault “very seriously.”
“We talked about all the different legislation that was out there; they were talking about some of the things that could be done administratively through the military,” the Washington Democrat said.
The first lady has been a strong advocate, along with Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, in pushing legislation and promoting more engagement from the private sector in programs to benefit military families and ensure the well-being of all military personnel.

Fitzpatrick Talks About the Growing Problem of Veteran Unemployment

“Last year the White House announced a new plan to tackle the high rate of unemployed veterans. Today the president and first lady announced that the ‘Joining Forces’ program was months ahead of schedule and has already helped 290,000 veterans or family members find work or receive career training. While I applaud the focus on tackling the problem of veteran unemployment, there is still more work to be done. As a member of the Congressional Veterans Jobs Caucus I am actively involved in finding ways to buck the trend of high veteran unemployment.

Pence To Sign Bill Giving In-State Tuition To Veterans

Governor Pence travels to Fort Wayne today where he will sign the Soldier‘s Tuition bill into law. The bill provides Indiana‘s veteran‘s in-state tuition to the state‘s colleges and universities. Senator Jim Banks (R-Columbia City), who authored the bill, says it is a win-win for Indiana and veterans.

Part I: Using Story as a Veteran’s Job Search Tool

It’s important to understand that our stated mission to employ our heroic armed forces after they have served doesn’t just mean creating jobs. It also means connecting each individual person with a job. And that is a system that is not just in trouble — it’s also dangerous. Because unless you pull back the curtain and look backstage, that system looks fine. Big whirring human resource machines, equipped with measurements, and cubicles and power points and everything. With all of that, the system as it is should work perfectly, right?

Jobs for Veterans: Kaine’s Troop Talent Act Hits Congress

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine’s (D-Va) bill to help veterans find employment and other resources more easily once entering civilian life was introduced Monday to the U.S. House of Representatives. The Troop Talent Act of 2013 is designed to help veterans effectively translate their military skills and credentials into civilian employment, Kaine said.

Coalition Forms to Put Veterans’ Skill to Work for America

“Thank you for your service.” As we commemorate Veteran’s Day, this simple expression of gratitude is undoubtedly appreciated by many of our service members, past and present, but many of America’s veterans could also use something else — a job. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the nation’s 21 million veterans, 11 million — more than half — are still in the workforce. Of those, 735,000 were unemployed in September 2012. The overall unemployment rate for veterans of 6.7 percent is slightly better than the national rate of 7.8 percent, but for “Gulf War era-II” veterans, the rate is 9.7 percent. For women veterans of the most recent era, it’s a staggering 19.9 percent.